Dates: June 1-30, 2016

The pine tree has offered much to Alabama’s culture, development and industry. From the longleaf pine forests that covered Alabama before settlement to the millions of acres of loblolly pine plantations that are part of our contemporary timber industry, pines have played a crucial role in Alabama culture, development and industry. Pines are symbolically and ceremonially important trees to many Native American people, but their meaning varies from tribe to tribe. Some view the pine tree as a symbol of longevity that denotes wisdom and harmony with nature. Today’s long-term management of pine forests produces a renewable resource, erosion protection, watershed, recreation and habitats for wildlife. For this exhibition, three Alabama artists look at pine from a variety of perspectives: Photographer Elmore DeMott of Montgomery tells the story of the life cycle of a pine tree with special focus on controlled forest burns through her photographs. Photographer Chuck Hemard of Auburn explores old-growth pines in his series of large-format photographs. Sculptor Chuck Moore of Valley have transformed salvaged pine and given the wood a new life as artwork. PINE will be on display in MAC’s Skinny Gallery and Small Room throughout the month of June.Meet the artists on ArtWalk night, June 10th, from 6:00 – 9:00 PM. The gallery will be open from 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM on weekdays.

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