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Date/Time
Date(s) - November 30, 2018 - December 31, 2018
All Day

Location
Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center

Categories


Using precious gems, minerals and metals, Chan crafts what her heart perceives, and imbues – pendants, rings, necklaces, bracelets, earrings – with symbolism and meaning. Gazing both heavenward and inward, she creates a body of work that invites introspection and affirmation.

“When I was a child growing up in Taiwan after the Second World War, my family would go to our garden after dinner,” said Chan. Her father introduced philosophy and encouraged discussions about Confucius, Napoleon and Churchill. He also talked about the sky, the stars and constellations. “That was a very interesting evening for me and my imagination could go wild,” said Chan. “Little did I know that I would be in Huntsville, Alabama, a center for this study of space.”

Images of celestial bodies complement the artist’s creations. Physical and emotional perspectives are expressed with simple though elegant appeal throughout the exhibition. “We came all this way to explore the moon and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth,” said Apollo Astronaut William Anders.

Heartfelt and thematic among astronauts, these expressions embrace a sense of true awe.

Dr. Deborah Barnhart, chief executive officer of the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, hopes the exhibit will inspire visitors of all ages to appreciate the science and art of space exploration. “These exquisite pieces remind guests about the importance of dreams and imagination in fueling space exploration.” The exhibit appeals to guests from all walks of life.

“Earth is a gem for us. It’s life,” said Chan. “I hope the young people will use their imagination and discover how beautiful space is, how beautiful the Earth is and that they will be inspired to study space and love the Earth.”

Celestial Dreams, the Art of Space Jewelry includes three dozen works featuring gold, platinum, a variety of pearls, diamonds, topaz, opals, aquamarine, rubies, tourmaline, garnets, amethyst and sapphires. Many pieces transcend from jewelry to decorative arts through clever and unique interlocking combinations. Pendants and earrings, for example, may detach from a necklace to provide the wearer multiple looks from a single piece. “The horizon is wide and there are no limits in my mind about what I am able to do,” said Chan.